Shipping containers will house Brighton’s homeless

15 April 2013

 

Brighton turns to an innovative solution to help ease the housing waiting list, Planet property reports.
There is high demand for more housing in the area and a planning application has been submitted by housing charity, Brighton Housing Trust, and local developers, QED for 36 shipping containers to be installed. These new homes will be located at Richardson’s Yard in the city centre. 
High house prices and low level incomes have triggered demand for more affordable housing. This temporary accommodation will be an inventive way to ease the area’s housing shortage. The solution is not only low cost; it is also economical, by recycling industrial products
Ross Gilbert from QED, said: ‘This scheme, if agreed, would put Brighton and Hove at the forefront of innovation, alongside Amsterdam and Bremen, in providing imaginative and high quality housing for temporary use.’
BHT Chief Executive, Andy Winter, said: ‘This is a typically Brighton idea, a solution to deal with a local problem.  The reaction we have had has been almost universally positive. The original concept has been developed and enhanced by some great suggestions people have made.
I have always said that what really excites me about this opportunity is that land that might otherwise lie idle for five years will be brought back into life and used to provide much-needed temporary accommodation for 36 men and women in Brighton and Hove.’

Brighton turns to an innovative solution to help ease the housing waiting list, Planet property reports.

There is high demand for more housing in the area and a planning application has been submitted by housing charity, Brighton Housing Trust, and local developers, QED for 36 shipping containers to be installed. These new homes will be located at Richardson’s Yard in the city centre. 

High house prices and low level incomes have triggered demand for more affordable housing. This temporary accommodation will be an inventive way to ease the area’s housing shortage. The solution is not only low cost; it is also economical, by recycling industrial products.

Ross Gilbert from QED, said: ‘This scheme, if agreed, would put Brighton and Hove at the forefront of innovation, alongside Amsterdam and Bremen, in providing imaginative and high quality housing for temporary use.’

BHT Chief Executive, Andy Winter, said: ‘This is a typically Brighton idea, a solution to deal with a local problem.  The reaction we have had has been almost universally positive. The original concept has been developed and enhanced by some great suggestions people have made.

I have always said that what really excites me about this opportunity is that land that might otherwise lie idle for five years will be brought back into life and used to provide much-needed temporary accommodation for 36 men and women in Brighton and Hove.’

Picture sourced from choices.co.uk

 

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